Glossary of terms used in the budget proposals

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Sometimes we use terms and phrases that may not be familiar to everyone. This is because there are specific terms associated with particular types of services that some people, mainly those using these services, will know and use. We have provided a short glossary to help explain some less well-known terms.

Adult social care charging policy:

A policy for deciding what a person who uses adult social care should pay towards the cost of their care. It provides a consistent and fair framework for charging for all services users who receive care and support services, following an assessment of their individual needs, and their individual financial circumstances.

Assets:

Buildings, land and technology owned by the Council.

Assurance:

Monitoring significant or high-risk activities to ensure that work is on track and no issues are arising.

Balanced budget:

A budget where revenue (or income) is equal to, or greater, than spending.

Block contract:

A contract where the purchaser pays in advance for a set number of activities at an overall price – like buying a bundle of bus tickets in advance at a discount.

Building-based services:

Services which are tied to a building from which they are arranged and delivered, rather than being available in a range of places or in people’s homes.

Business rates:

A tax on the occupation of non-domestic, or commercial, property such as shops; offices; pubs; warehouses; factories; holiday rental homes or guest houses. Also known as Non-Domestic Rates.

Capital spending:

One-off spending on assets, technology or equipment such as vehicles, buildings and IT equipment.

Carers:

People who provide help or support to children, family members, friends, or neighbours who have physical or mental ill-health, disability, or issues related to old age.

Commissioning:

The process of arranging and purchasing services that meet the needs of residents.

Comprehensive Spending Review:

The process by which Her Majesty’s Treasury sets Governmental budgets and the key services and improvements which these will fund.

Corporate parenting:

The collective responsibility of a council, its elected members, employees, and partner agencies, for providing the best possible care and safeguarding for the children who are looked after by the Council.

Digital transformation:

Where digital technology is used to fundamentally change, or transform, a business or service.

Direct payments:

Where the Council provides a payment to the individual needing care who can then employ a personal assistant to meet their needs rather than this being arranged through the local authority.

Domiciliary Care:

Care that is provided to people who still live in their own homes but require additional support with activities, including household tasks, personal care and any other activity that allows them to maintain both their independence and quality of life.

In-house:

Done or existing within the Council.

Funding gap:

The gap between the money that the Council has to spend and the money that the Council is committed to spend on goods and services.

Shared services:

Services which are jointly provided and received by the Council and another council or partner.

Spot purchase:

A purchase which is not done as part of a wider contract, usually because it is an emergency or likely to be a unique purchase.

Transition:

In education, transition refers to the movement of pupils from primary to secondary schooling. Within social services it refers to the move of a client from children’s to adult social care.

Sometimes we use terms and phrases that may not be familiar to everyone. This is because there are specific terms associated with particular types of services that some people, mainly those using these services, will know and use. We have provided a short glossary to help explain some less well-known terms.

Adult social care charging policy:

A policy for deciding what a person who uses adult social care should pay towards the cost of their care. It provides a consistent and fair framework for charging for all services users who receive care and support services, following an assessment of their individual needs, and their individual financial circumstances.

Assets:

Buildings, land and technology owned by the Council.

Assurance:

Monitoring significant or high-risk activities to ensure that work is on track and no issues are arising.

Balanced budget:

A budget where revenue (or income) is equal to, or greater, than spending.

Block contract:

A contract where the purchaser pays in advance for a set number of activities at an overall price – like buying a bundle of bus tickets in advance at a discount.

Building-based services:

Services which are tied to a building from which they are arranged and delivered, rather than being available in a range of places or in people’s homes.

Business rates:

A tax on the occupation of non-domestic, or commercial, property such as shops; offices; pubs; warehouses; factories; holiday rental homes or guest houses. Also known as Non-Domestic Rates.

Capital spending:

One-off spending on assets, technology or equipment such as vehicles, buildings and IT equipment.

Carers:

People who provide help or support to children, family members, friends, or neighbours who have physical or mental ill-health, disability, or issues related to old age.

Commissioning:

The process of arranging and purchasing services that meet the needs of residents.

Comprehensive Spending Review:

The process by which Her Majesty’s Treasury sets Governmental budgets and the key services and improvements which these will fund.

Corporate parenting:

The collective responsibility of a council, its elected members, employees, and partner agencies, for providing the best possible care and safeguarding for the children who are looked after by the Council.

Digital transformation:

Where digital technology is used to fundamentally change, or transform, a business or service.

Direct payments:

Where the Council provides a payment to the individual needing care who can then employ a personal assistant to meet their needs rather than this being arranged through the local authority.

Domiciliary Care:

Care that is provided to people who still live in their own homes but require additional support with activities, including household tasks, personal care and any other activity that allows them to maintain both their independence and quality of life.

In-house:

Done or existing within the Council.

Funding gap:

The gap between the money that the Council has to spend and the money that the Council is committed to spend on goods and services.

Shared services:

Services which are jointly provided and received by the Council and another council or partner.

Spot purchase:

A purchase which is not done as part of a wider contract, usually because it is an emergency or likely to be a unique purchase.

Transition:

In education, transition refers to the movement of pupils from primary to secondary schooling. Within social services it refers to the move of a client from children’s to adult social care.