Climate Emergency

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The Climate Emergency facing our world is a very real issue, but there is plenty we can do to take action to help protect our planet.

Cheshire West and Chester Council declared a Climate Emergency in the borough in 2019 and put forward its Climate Emergency Response plan, which aims to help the borough become carbon neutral by 2045.

This is a space to share ideas, stories and tips about what you are doing locally to reduce your carbon emissions and impact on the environment. Now's the time to react and play your part to make our borough carbon neutral.


The Climate Emergency facing our world is a very real issue, but there is plenty we can do to take action to help protect our planet.

Cheshire West and Chester Council declared a Climate Emergency in the borough in 2019 and put forward its Climate Emergency Response plan, which aims to help the borough become carbon neutral by 2045.

This is a space to share ideas, stories and tips about what you are doing locally to reduce your carbon emissions and impact on the environment. Now's the time to react and play your part to make our borough carbon neutral.


  • Marvellous makeover for Park and Ride buses

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    2 February 2022

    Chester’s Park and Ride buses have had an eye-catching makeover for 2022 to grab the attention of visitors and commuters.

    Nine buses are used to run frequent services direct into the heart of the city from three Park and Ride sites at Boughton Heath, Upton (Zoo) and Wrexham Road. The buses are owned and operated by Stagecoach on behalf of Cheshire West and Chester Council.

    The fresh new design is the product of Chester design company, Lemondrop Creative, and features a ‘Clean and Green Chester’ theme with a sky-blue base colour adorned with flowers and butterflies. Also incorporated is a nod to the City’s Roman heritage, horse racing and its famous Zoo. The aim is to encourage residents and visitors to access the City in a sustainable way, reducing traffic congestion and improving air quality.

    These vehicles, new in 2016, were built in Britain by Alexander-Dennis, and the first to operate in Chester powered by the latest ‘Euro 6’ low emission engines.

    The Council’s Deputy Leader and Cabinet Member for Environment, Highways and Strategic Transport, Councillor Karen Shore said:

    “Stagecoach’s current Park and Ride vehicles were due a ‘mid-life’ overhaul which usually includes a fresh coat of paint.

    “The existing design has adorned Park and Ride buses since 2009, so the Council was delighted to accept the unique opportunity offered by Stagecoach to re-brand these buses with a new eye-catching livery.

    “I’m sure they’ll attract lots of attention as they travel across the City. The Park and Ride service is quick, easy and cheap – why not give it a go next time you visit Chester.”

    Matt Davies, Managing Director of Stagecoach said:

    "The new colour scheme for Chester's Park and Ride buses looks great. It is bright and fresh and will catch everyone’s eye.

    “With the benefits of using the Park and Ride including free Wi-Fi and USB charging, air conditioning, free parking and free travel for children, we hope motorists driving into Chester will be persuaded that using the service is a smarter, cleaner and greener way to travel.”

    In addition to the new waiting room at Boughton Heath, all Park and Ride sites are currently being refreshed with a major vegetation cut back and the fitting of ‘real time information’ screens which will advise customers at a glance when the next bus is due.

    Park and Ride services operate seven days a week, an ‘all day’ ticket costs just £2 per passenger, and up to three children under 16 travel free with an adult. Regular travellers can buy a ‘£10 Ticket Bundle’ which offers six days’ travel for the price of five. Payment can be made from the ticket machines on site, or to save hunting for change, simply pay the driver with your ‘contactless’ card.

    More information on the Park and Ride can be found on the Council’s website.

  • Council working with landowners to create wetland habitat across the borough

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    1 February 2022

    On World Wetlands Day (2 February), Cheshire West and Chester Council is highlighting the work that is taking place across the borough to create important wetlands that will support a range of native wildlife.

    Wetlands are critically important ecosystems that contribute to biodiversity, freshwater availability and climate mitigation and adaptation. World Wetlands Day highlights the importance of these bodies of water and, how worldwide, wetlands are being lost three times faster than forests with nearly 90 per cent of all wetland habitats, including ponds, disappearing in the last 300 years.

    As part of the Council’s work to address the nature crisis, the Council is acting as the habitat delivery body for Natural England's great crested newt strategic licensing scheme, known as District Level Licensing (DLL).

    Under DLL, developers pay a conservation payment, which is then used to create or restore new ponds in strategic areas within the borough. The ponds are secured, monitored, and managed for 25 years – all funded by the developers.

    Since the scheme started in 2018, the Council has created over 108 ponds, including 50 in the last 12 months. The Council’s Total Environment Team continue to monitor these, ensuring they remain healthy and thriving habitats for local wildlife.

    Councillor Matt Bryan, Cabinet Member for Housing, Planning and Climate Emergency, said: “Ponds play an important role in our borough providing ecosystems that supports amphibians, such as great crested newts, and also birds, mammals, and invertebrates.

    “Our Total Environment Team are aiming to restore an average of 50 ponds a year, creating around 9,000m2 of wetland habitat – an area greater than a football pitch.

    “These wetlands will help cycle nutrients in our waterways, removing environmental pollutants, whilst also providing places for our communities to connect with nature, something that we know provides benefits to people’s health and wellbeing.”

    The Council is asking landowners and farmers in the borough to come forward, if they are interested in creating and restoring ponds on their land. A grant is available to successful applicants to cover the full costs of each pond creation or restoration on their land.

    Applications must come from within the Natural England target areas and conform to design specifications for size, depth, and profile. More than one third of land in the borough falls within the target area. The Council’s Total Environment team can provide support and advice throughout the application process.

    To find out more about the scheme, and to see if you are eligible, please contact the biodiversity team by emailing: Biodiversity@cheshirewestandchester.gov.uk

    The Council is currently working with the Land Trust, Friends of the Countess of Chester Country Park, Environment Agency and other partners to explore potential opportunities for a large wetland restoration project, west of Chester. The key aims of the project would be to increase biodiversity and improve water quality whilst reconnecting a watercourse with its floodplain.

    The wetland habitat also has potential to act as a carbon sink, which will prevent the release of harmful greenhouse gases. Other potential benefits from the project would be to bring local conservation and environmental groups together and providing educational resources for the local community.

    This project is in the early stages and further information will be shared on the Council’s Climate Emergency Inspire webpage once funding for delivery and management has been secured.

  • 22 Simple changes for a more sustainable 2022

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    24 January 2022

    As our planet is getting warmer, climate change is a hot topic. The Council's Climate Emergency Response Plan sets out how the borough aims to become carbon neutral by 2045. We can all take action to reduce our impact on the planet. Here are 22 simple changes that you could make in 2022 for a more sustainable year.

    Food

    1. Take reusable bags when you go shopping and choose packaging-free fruit and vegetables.

    2. Buy local, fresh, seasonal produce – it will have travelled fewer miles to get to you, and you'll be supporting local businesses too.

    3. Eating less meat and dairy products will reduce your carbon footprint. Try introducing a few plant-based foods into your diet.

    4. When you open your fridge/freezer door, get everything you need out in one go. Every time you open the door, your fridge/freezer uses extra energy to get back to temperature.

    5. If you don't have a garden, use a windowsill or worktop to grow your own herbs instead of buying them. You could even reuse a plastic bottle as a container. As well as being therapeutic, you'll save money and use less packaging.

    Home

    6. Replace standard light bulbs with light emitting diodes (LED) lights – they usually last a lot longer and are more energy efficient than incandescent bulbs.

    7. Reduce your shower time by just one minute – you'll save between 5-15 litres of water and it could save you money.

    8. If you haven't already got one, ask your energy provider for a smart meter so you can keep an eye on how much energy you're using. Alternatively, take meter readings more often to track your usage.

    9. If you're buying soil for planting, make sure it's peat-free. Our peatlands store carbon, help to reduce flooding and provide habitat for different species, so peat is best left where it is.

    10. If you can, line dry your clothes instead of using a tumble drier. A household that normally runs the tumble drier 200 times a year could save nearly half a tonne of CO2e, and around £90 a year by drying clothes outside or on a clothes rack inside.

    Stuff

    11. If you have clothes you no longer wear, try selling them, going to a clothes swap or donating them to a charity shop. This is a more sustainable way of getting rid of unwanted clothes – reusing is better than recycling.

    12. If you're looking to purchase a product, consider buying second-hand. Click here for more ideas and information about buying pre-loved items.

    13. There's a lot more that can be recycled these days. The Council's Waste and Recycling webpages has lots of information about recycling at home and in the borough's recycling centres.

    14. Go paperless – you can access statements and bills online.

    15. The unsustainable production of palm oil is one of the biggest threats facing forests and wildlife in areas of South East Asia. Look for the RSPO label to ensure you purchase products that have been made with certified sustainable palm oil. Find out more about sustainable palm oil on Chester Zoo's website.

    Travel

    16. Walk or cycle if you need to go on a short journey – it's better for the environment and for your physical and mental wellbeing.

    17. Make travel part of the holiday: could you get to your destination by train, boat or car, instead of taking a flight with higher emissions? A journey from London to Madrid, for example, would emit 43kg of CO2 per passenger by train, but 118kg by plane, according to EcoPassenger.

    18. If you have to drive, drive smarter: having the correct air pressure in your tyres gives better mileage, cheaper maintenance and a smaller environmental impact. Car sharing is also a great way to reduce your climate impact.

    19. Whilst on holiday, eat local foods instead of imported ones. You'll be reducing your carbon footprint and supporting the local economy.

    Work

    20. Emails can add to your carbon footprint. Try reducing the number in your inbox by unsubscribing from any enewsletters you don't read, and really consider who you need to cc into your emails.

    21. Set your printer to black and white and double-sided, and only print documents if you need to.

    22. If you are heading into work, take a cutlery set with you so you don't need plastic cutlery when buying lunch.

    Try making some of these simple changes then take the WWF's environmental footprint questionnaire or visit Giki Zero to calculate your personal carbon footprint.


    Sources:

    World Wildlife Fund - www.wwf.org.uk
    WRAP - www.wrap.org.uk

    Energy Saving Trust - https://energysavingtrust.org.uk

    Sustrans - www.sustrans.org.uk

    BBC - https://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-49349566

    Chester Zoo - Chester Zoo's website


    Every effort has been made to that ensure the information used in all climate emergency articles is accurate. All information used to inform the articles has been taken from reputable sources and those sources are given at the end of each article.

    We are aware, however, that data will change over time and that some information across the internet and printed matters can be contradictory.


  • Wellbeing Walks in west Cheshire

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    31 January 2022

    There is a regular series of weekday Wellbeing Walks available across the borough run by Cheshire West and Chester Council in partnership with The Ramblers.

    All of the walks are led by a team of enthusiastic and friendly volunteer walk leaders. Walkers are recommended to wear appropriate footwear and clothing as the walks take place in all weather conditions throughout the year.

    No advanced booking is needed walkers just need to register for their first walk. New walkers are always welcome.

    Councillor Louise Gittins, Leader of Cheshire West and Chester Council said:

    “Walking is an excellent and simple way to increase your activity levels, tone up, help manage your weight, reduce your blood pressure, make your heart fitter and is good for your mental wellbeing.

    “Now is the perfect time to put those New Year Resolutions into practise. Walking in a group helps you to stay motivated, gives you the opportunity to make new friends and experience new places and greenspaces.”

    Current walks available (all walk durations are approximate.)

    Monday Walks

    Tuesday Walks

    Wednesday Walks

    Thursday Walks

    • Malpas Long Walks every second Thursday starting 10.15am (60 to 90 minutes) Contact: suenorwood03@gmail.com or Wendy: 01829 250413
    • Helsby Wellbeing Walk starting 10.30am (30 Minutes) Contact John: 01928 722292 or email: j.c.dearden@ljmu.ac.uk

    Friday Walks

    The Council is looking to grow the programme and host walks in other areas of the borough. Full training provided in conjunction with The Ramblers.

    Anyone interested in becoming a volunteer walk leader or setting up a walk can contact the Health Ranger to receive more information contact: healthranger@cheshirewestandchester.gov.uk

    For more information on the wellbeing walk programme there is a promotional video https://youtu.be/Mgy9iuBbWs0

  • Highway Code changes

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    28 January 2022

    From the 29 January 2022, The Highway Code is changing. The advisory changes are to improve safety for people walking, cycling and horse riding.

    Every road user still has a responsibility to keep themselves and each other safe, and the changes mean being ready to give priority, leave space and be considerate of others.

    Councillor Karen Shore, Cheshire West and Chester Council, Cabinet Member for Environment, Highways & Strategic Transport said:

    “All road users should make themselves aware of the new changes that include important updates for pedestrians, cyclists and motorists.

    “The changes have been designed to increase the safety for road users most likely to be injured in the event of a collision, pedestrians, cyclists, horse riders and motorcyclists.”

    There is a new hierarchy of road users to ensure those who can do the greatest harm have the greatest responsibility to reduce the danger or threat they may pose to others.

    This means:

    • Giving people crossing and waiting to cross and cyclists (or people cycling) going straight ahead priority when turning in and out of junctions
    • Giving plenty of space when passing people cycling and horse riders
    • And making sure we’re acting with responsibility and respect to all road

    The updated Highway Code now adds

    • You now should give people crossing and waiting to cross and cyclists going straight ahead priority when turning in and out of junctions.
    • You now should leave at least 1.5 metres when overtaking people cycling at speeds of up to 30mph and give them more space when overtaking at higher speeds.
    • When driving, you should now pass horse riders and horse-drawn vehicles at speeds under 10 mph and allow at least 2 metres of space.
    • You should now allow at least 2 metres of space and keep to a low speed when passing a pedestrian who is walking in the road.
    • Car users should now open their doors with the hand furthest from the door, to help them look over their shoulder to see cyclists or pedestrians nearby.
    • People may cycle in the centre of the lane or two abreast for their own safety, whilst allowing others to overtake when it is safe for them to do so

    The changes can be viewed in full by visiting: www.gov.uk/dft/highway-code-changes

  • Play your part plea for pavements

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    26 January 2022

    Many people would consider 4am a very early start but not for Cheshire West and Chester Council’s StreetCare teams, who are out and about from that time keeping the borough clean.

    The Council is asking anyone who throws chewing gum or cigarette ends onto the borough’s pavements to stop. Throwing litter is actually an offence and you could be fined. A Fixed Penalty Notice for littering could leave you £120 out of pocket (£90 if paid within seven days).

    When you are walking out and about in the borough you may not think about what has gone on, sometimes in the very early hours of the morning, to keep the borough’s pavements clean and tidy.

    The Council’s StreetCare teams have to clean 2445km of pavement across the borough using a variety of equipment.

    High heat, low pressure jet washing is used up to three times a year in busy areas, like high streets and town centres, where grime and chewing gum can build up.

    Feathered friends like pigeons can also cause problems and pressure washing ensures these areas are kept clean, particularly near ‘al fresco’ dining areas.

    Larger mechanical sweeping is used to remove general litter, detritus and leaves in town and village centre, as well as retail areas. However, some jobs still require manual brushing and litter picking by hand.

    On road junctions and crossing island near to agricultural land or woodland manual ‘digging out’ is sometimes needed to keep edges clean and free from debris.

    During the summer months there is the added job of weed control, particularly when a hot dry summer follows April showers in the spring.

    They also blow away grass clippings when grass cutting operations start.

    And it’s not just Council teams who keep the borough looking good, volunteer litter pickers also do a great job keeping their communities clean.

    The Council’s Deputy Leader and Cabinet Member for Environment, Highways and Strategic Transport, Councillor Karen Shore said:

    “It’s not something you may have thought about but keeping the pavements beneath our feet clean is a huge job for our teams.

    “I would like to say a big thank you to our StreetCare teams for keeping the show on the road throughout the winter months. They do a great job is often challenging conditions. We are also extremely grateful to the many volunteers, such as local ‘Wombles’ groups, for playing their part and helping us to keep the borough clean and tidy. Thank you all.”

  • Cycling and walking could soon be on prescription in Ellesmere Port

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    24 January 2022

    Cheshire West and Chester Council has successfully secured £100,000 of funding to develop ‘social prescribing’ options in Ellesmere Port, following a bid to the Department for Transport (DfT).

    This could see people in the town being prescribed cycling or walking activities by their GP, nurse or other general practice staff to boost their health and wellbeing.

    Earlier on in 2021, the DfT invited local councils to express an interest in taking part in a pilot scheme for areas with relatively poor health and low physical activity rates.

    Following two successful rounds of assessment, the Council has successfully reached the Feasibility Study stage of the project, along with just 11 other local authorities.

    If successful at the final stage, the project will see NHS staff prescribing cycling or walking where appropriate, making bicycles available as well as cycle training, access to cycling groups and peer support to keep motivation and participation high.

    The application was a partnership between transport and public health colleagues at the Council along with One Ellesmere Port Primary Care Network – which is six GP Practices working together across the town - and a wide range of partners from the charity and voluntary sector.

    The Council’s Deputy Leader and Cabinet Member for Environment, Highways and Strategic Transport, Councillor Karen Shore said: “This is really good news. We will now be able to build on our valuable cycling and pedestrian improvement projects that have already taken place in Ellesmere Port, so people can choose from a range of active travel options.

    “If we are successful at the final stage, we will be able to build on existing social prescribing and develop a range of tailored cycling and walking activities with the ultimate aim to increase the number of “active travel” journeys taken by residents to improve their health and wellbeing.”

    Active travel projects already completed for cyclists and pedestrians include the shared use pathways on the A5117, Sutton Way Boulevard Ellesmere Port to Chester Canal Tow path; part funded by Local growth funding awarded by the Cheshire and Warrington LEP, and also Stanney Lane Boulevard and Thornton Road.

    Infrastructure improvements will be planned to increase the attractiveness of cycling. The Council’s Local Walking and Cycling Infrastructure Plan (LCWIP) provides a strategic approach to identify where cycling and walking improvements are required at a local level over a 10-year period. Projects could include access to good quality green spaces and routes away from traffic with potential segregated lanes, low traffic neighbourhoods, and secure cycle parking.

    Dr Emily Morton, Co-Clinical Director One Ellesmere Port, said: “I am extremely happy to see this project get going. It reflects strong partnership working, bringing the Council, the Department for Transport and the local health service together to improve quality of life in Ellesmere Port. This represents the type of planning, that has the power to really improve the well-being of our residents.”

    The project team hope to secure final stage funding from April 2022 onwards.

    If successful, experience and learning from the pilot will be shared to support other areas who are keen to take a similar approach.

    Anyone in Ellesmere Port interested in active travel prescribing can speak to their GP receptionist. There are many opportunities to be more physically active across west Cheshire, with guided walks taking place in various locations, you can find out more information by going to the Live Well Cheshire West website and searching for ‘Eat Well Be Active’.

  • Community comes together to plant trees for the Jubilee

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    17 January 2022

    To celebrate Chester becoming a Queen’s Green Canopy Champion City, volunteers came together to plant 360 trees at a community event in the Countess of Chester Country Park on Saturday, 15 January.

    Over 40 volunteers joined The Mersey Forest, The Conservation Volunteers (TCV) and the Friends of the Countess of Chester Park group to plant a range of native trees including Oak, Birch, Hawthorn and Hazel.

    The woodland will form part of the Queen’s Green Canopy (QGC), a unique, national tree planting initiative to mark Her Majesty’s Platinum Jubilee this year.

    Chester has been recognised as a QGC Champion City, joining 13 other cities nationally, and will work with The Mersey Forest to undertake a wide range of tree planting projects across the borough, throughout the year.

    Alongside the woodland planting, The Lord-Lieutenant, Lady Redmond planted a Jubilee tree on the site, before presenting a plaque to the Sheriff of Chester, Councillor Jill Houlbrook, on behalf of the Queen’s Green Canopy Foundation, in recognition of the city’s status as a QGC Champion City.

    The Jubilee tree species is an Oak, a native species which will grow to up to 40 metres high and supports more life than any other native tree species in the UK.

    The Sheriff of Chester also planted an Oak tree on the day to mark the 900th anniversary of the role of Sheriff of Chester.

    The Lord-Lieutenant, Lady Redmond MBE, said:

    “I am extremely proud that Chester has been given this well deserved award as one of the QGC’s Champion Cities. Congratulations on a fantastic plan for planting new trees and establishing new woodland within the city, as well as supporting local people to be trained in woodland creation and management; an impressive and important legacy celebrating Her Majesty’s Platinum Jubilee.’”

    Councillor Louise Gittins, Leader of Cheshire West and Chester Council, said:

    “It’s great to see so many people getting involved with the tree planting at this popular local park. This site forms part of the wider Mersey Forest, which is connecting people with nature, something that we know is beneficial for our residents’ health and wellbeing. As it establishes, the woodland will become a carbon store, playing an important role in helping the borough to become carbon neutral by 2045, as well as boosting biodiversity in the area.”

    The trees planted have been funded by The Mersey Forest Foundation. The Foundation is the charitable arm of The Mersey Forest Partnership and allows local people and businesses to donate towards tree planting across Merseyside and Cheshire.

  • Council's winter maintenance keeps the great outdoors looking great

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    14 January 2022

    As we approach Blue Monday on 17 January, recognised by many as the least cheerful day of the year, Cheshire West and Chester Council is hard at work making sure its parks look great for everyone to enjoy the great outdoors.

    Though it might be the middle of winter, the Council’s maintenance teams are out and about making sure the borough’s parks, open spaces, bowling greens and football pitches are well cared for. Work undertaken by the Council’s StreetCare teams and Greenspace officers includes hedge cutting, grass cutting on pitches and greens, hedge laying, bin emptying, litter-picking, pruning plus other habitat management - anything from reed removal to putting up owl boxes.

    The Council’s Deputy Leader and Cabinet Member for Environment, Highways and Strategic Transport, Councillor Karen Shore said:

    “I’m very grateful to our maintenance and Greenspace teams for all the hard work they do to keep our lovely parks and green spaces looking good over the winter months. We’ve had some extreme weather over the past couple of months, and it’s challenging, particularly in cold or wet weather.

    “Next Monday, 17 January may be ‘Blue Monday’ but what better way to beat the winter blues than a walk in one of our lovely parks and open spaces? They can look particularly stunning at this time of year.

    “The pandemic has shown how good getting outdoors can be for us, and our teams are busy doing a wonderful job of keeping everything looking great. I would also like to thank the many volunteers and ‘Friends of’ groups in the borough for their work all year round as well. They are incredibly dedicated and really help us get our parks and open spaces looking their best – thank you.”

  • Tips to cut your energy use and help you stay warm this winter

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    With energy bills rising, many of us are looking at ways to reduce our costs and keep our homes warm at the same time.

    The Citizens Advice and the Energy Saving Trust are sharing useful advice about keeping warm this winter. Here are some simple steps that could save you money and reduce the amount of energy you are using, which, in turn, will also reduce your personal carbon footprint.

    • Only fill and boil the kettle with as much water as you need. The most energy-saving kettles have a low minimum-fill line, and switch off quickly after boiling.
    • Cutting your shower time by just one minute could make you savings. If everyone in a four-person household with a water meter did this, you could save £50 a year.
    • By turning your appliances off instead of leaving them on standby, you could save £40 a year and cut your carbon footprint.
    • If it’s time to replace a lightbulb, switch to a light emitting diodes (LEDs) lightbulb and save up to £9 per year, compared to a 100 watt incandescent bulb.
    • Draught proofing your home could save you £30 a year on your bills and will help to keep your home warmer. For tips on reducing home heat loss, visit the Energy Saving Trusts website.
    • Installing a chimney draught excluder could save you around £20 a year on your bills and make your home feel more comfortable.
    • Try turning your room thermostat down by just one degree and you could save around £65 a year on your energy bill.
    • Drawing the blinds at dusk can reduce heat loss by 13-14 per cent and curtains from 15-17 per cent.

    Staying healthy this winter

    The NHS, Age UK and British Heart Foundation have a good range of information on keeping warm and safe in winter.

    • Have regular hot drinks and food such as porridge, soups and stews. Eating regularly helps keep you warm.
    • Keep as active as possible to boost your circulation. Move around at least once an hour and avoid sitting still for long periods. Even light exercise will help keep you warm.
    • When you do sit down, put your feet up as it’s coldest nearest the ground.
    • Dress in layers and wear a hat, gloves and scarf when you go out. When inside wear warm socks and slippers to keep feet warm.

    Grants and payments

    • Green Homes Grant – If you have an annual combined household income of £30,000 (gross) or less and your property has an Energy Performance Certificate (EPC) rating of E, F or G you could benefit from the Council’s Green Homes Grant, which offers funding for a variety of energy efficient measures for your home. These include wall, loft and underfloor insulation, and low-carbon heating such as air source heat pumps, solar panels, heating controls and replacement doors and windows. These measures will help reduce costly energy bills, whilst also lowering energy use and associated carbon emissions. Find out more about the scheme and how to apply.
    • Winter Fuel Payment - If you were born on or before 26 September 1955, you could be entitled to the Winter Fuel Payment - an annual one-off payment to help you pay for heating during the winter. Find out more and how to apply on GOV.UK.
    • Warm Home Discount Scheme - If you are on a low income or you get the guarantee credit part of Pension Credit, you might be able to get £140 off your electricity bill or a £140 voucher for your prepayment meter through the Warm Home Discount Scheme. Find out more and how to apply on GOV.UK.


    Energy efficient heating

    If you are interested in making your home heating system more energy efficient, saving money on your fuel bills, as well as reducing your carbon emissions, the Energy Saving Trust has a useful guide on heating your home. This includes information on air source heat pumps, biomass and solar water heating.

    Further support

    The Council has worked with a range of partner organisations to develop a package of support for those most in need, supporting what we already have in place to help vulnerable households and individuals. More information about this can be found on the Council website.

    Source:

    Every effort has been made to ensure that the information used in all climate emergency articles is accurate. All information used to inform the articles has been taken from reputable sources and those sources are given at the end of each article.

    We are aware, however, that data will change over time and that some information across the internet and printed matters can be contradictory. If you have any questions or comments about any articles please email: climatechange3@cheshirewestandchester.gov.uk